“Be an adviser, not a salesperson.”

Ranch or Bleu Cheese?

Try placing a piece of the salad next to only one kind. For example, you could put a cherry tomato most prominent on only the bleu cheese salads. You’ll never confuse the two again!

There’s a great book by Michael Lynn, Professor of Hospitality at Cornell, based on actual scientific research conducted in hundreds upon hundreds of restaurants. These are the top twenty things that increased tip percentages, though you should click through to the full book and read each section. For example, as a waiter drawing a smiley face on a check actually has a negative impact on your tip even though for a waitress it is a very positive one. The full guide can be found over here.

There’s a great book by Michael Lynn, Professor of Hospitality at Cornell, based on actual scientific research conducted in hundreds upon hundreds of restaurants. These are the top twenty things that increased tip percentages, though you should click through to the full book and read each section. For example, as a waiter drawing a smiley face on a check actually has a negative impact on your tip even though for a waitress it is a very positive one. The full guide can be found over here.

Old World and New World Wines

New world is a blanket term for the countries and the countries preferred wine making techniques. New World tends to use a bit more science, new processes and good old fashioned “tinkering” in their wine production. Old World places like France, Germany, Italy and Spain tend to rely on the terroir alone.

The following advice, for the most part, applies to fine-dining and catering, but it could be a useful flair for anyone in the food industry. It might even surprise a guest who might usually frequent fine-dining or catered events (or who is a caterer or manager themselves) to see some of these techniques employed at a less-than-fine-dining place. It could make for quite a good impression!

Serving from the Left has its orientations from the Butler style of service in which food is offered from the left. Offered being the key word. The tray of food is offered and either the guest takes the desired food choice(s) from the platter, or the Butler places the desired food onto the guests’ plate.

The food is also removed from the right. The only thing removed from the Left is bread plates (because that is where they are).

When the food is pre-plated for the guest, as most food now is, the food is delivered from the right and removed from the right. Remember though, consistency is more important that formality. With that being said, as long as every server in your restaurant follows the same protocol, regardless of what it is, you are one step ahead of most restaurants in terms of service.

How to Pour Wine:
Peel away foil.
Wipe bottle neck (mostly because it looks good).
Leave the wine glass on the table, and pour using either your right hand or both hands with the wine label clearly visible during the pour. 
Twist the bottle towards the end of the pour to keep wine from dripping (wipe any drips you miss).
(Optional) Fold a wine bottle napkin like this.
Remember:
When opening wine for a guest, whenever possible you should present and pour the wine from the guests right hand side.
When you open a bottle of wine for a guest at a table, after they have tasted and approved the wine, you pour for the other guests moving around the table clockwise.
Keep the “fall” between the opening of the bottle and the bottom of the glass between 6-10 inches, allowing the wine to aerate on the way down).

How to Pour Wine:

  1. Peel away foil.
  2. Wipe bottle neck (mostly because it looks good).
  3. Leave the wine glass on the table, and pour using either your right hand or both hands with the wine label clearly visible during the pour. 
  4. Twist the bottle towards the end of the pour to keep wine from dripping (wipe any drips you miss).
  5. (Optional) Fold a wine bottle napkin like this.

Remember:

  • When opening wine for a guest, whenever possible you should present and pour the wine from the guests right hand side.
  • When you open a bottle of wine for a guest at a table, after they have tasted and approved the wine, you pour for the other guests moving around the table clockwise.
  • Keep the “fall” between the opening of the bottle and the bottom of the glass between 6-10 inches, allowing the wine to aerate on the way down).

Three Quick Ways to Sell a Dessert

The genius over at TipsSquared has great advice, here’s some for selling desserts:

Let’s be honest.  If chocolate, cheesecake, and apple pie were healthy, calorie free, and provided you with all your daily vitamins and minerals, would you ever eat a salad?  Most people like steaks, salads, and pastas, but they love dessert.  Yet most servers will sell far more entrees than desserts.  Your guests come to the table with a great number of expectations and beliefs.  One of the most common beliefs is that ordering dessert is gluttonous or wasteful.  While you should not try to change that belief, you can always take a shot at being an exception to it.

Selling desserts is about exploiting the contradiction between what the guest feels they should do and what they want to do.  Buying a dessert is an emotional decision rather than a logical one.  You have to make the dessert appeal to their senses.  You have to instill the belief that the pleasure they will receive will outweigh any guilt they may feel afterwards.

In order to capitalize on these emotions to sell desserts, keep in mind the following concepts.

Ambush and Assume:Once you have cleared the table following entrees, you have the opportunity to get their attention for your last pitch.  You want to bring any visuals of the desserts you have to the table.  Dessert trays and menus should be used as props, but the sale is made through your words.  Approach the table as if you are going to find out what desserts they want, not if they are going to have dessert.  This will overcome their first line of defense.  When you describe your favorite desserts, use as many sensory words as possible.  You should be painting a picture in their mind of not just the ingredients and appearance, but also the tastes and texture.  Your confidence and presentation must e strong enough to temporarily overwhelm their intellectual predispositions.

Dessert To Go:This is one of the most lucrative tips in this book.  Always look for and suggest opportunities to take dessert to go.  If a pair of young parents is out celebrating their anniversary, offer a piece of cake for the babysitter.  After a business dinner runs late, offer to box up the signature dessert to take to their spouse.  Even if a guest is full, a piece of piece of pie might hit the spot later.  Know what desserts travel well and don’t require refrigeration.  These sales take very little effort and time and can increase a check considerably.

Complete the Course:When a guest does order dessert, you have opened up a wide array of opportunities for additional sales.  If a guest is going to remain at your table while their dessert is being made and eaten, you need to take as many shots as possible to keep them spending money.  The easiest and most overlooked way to do this is to offer a coffee, cappuccino, espresso, or latte.  How about a shot in that drink?  Would they enjoy an after dinner drink or aperitif?  Would their dessert be better alamode?  Sales opportunities abound, look for them.

Selling desserts effectively requires a unique set of skills.  As you practice them, they should become second nature.  The casualness that you approach selling desserts with will get you past their instant rejection reaction. When you are past that, it all comes down to your descriptions and follow up.  The meal is not finished after entrees, and your tip should not be either.

Sourced from TipsSquared